Donate Now Menu

Agenda and Workshops

Tanya Talaga

Keynote Speaker – Sponsored by Shell

Tanya Talaga is an Anishinaabe author and speaker. Talaga’s first book, Seven Fallen Feathers, is a national bestseller, winning the RBC Taylor Prize, the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, and the First Nation Communities Read Award: Young Adult/Adult. The book was also a finalist for the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Nonfiction Prize and the BC National Award for Nonfiction. Talaga was the 2017–2018 Atkinson Fellow in Public Policy and the 2018 CBC Massey Lecturer, the first woman of Ojibwe descent to be so. Her second book, also a national bestseller, is All Our Relations: Finding The Path Forward. Talaga’s mother’s family is from Fort William First Nation and her father was Polish.

For more than twenty years, Talaga was a journalist at the Toronto Star. She was nominated five times for the Michener Award in public service journalism and has been part of two teams that have won National Newspaper Awards for Project of the Year. 

Talaga is CEO of Makwa Creative Inc., a production company focused on Indigenous storytelling. 

Talaga holds an honorary Doctorate of Letters from Lakehead University, Thunder Bay.


2020 Agenda

Wednesday November 25

7:00 p.m.

Post Secondary Student Experience Panel Discussion.
Sponsored by CN

Students Karen Aglukark, Ryan Hogan and Gillian McIvor will discuss their experiences as Indigenous students in post secondary educational settings.

Moderated by Elizabeth Zarpa, Indspire Board Director

Thursday November 26

TD Bank Day

1:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Welcome/Elder Blessing
Guiding the Journey Recipient Presentation – Community Service
WORKSHOP 1 – Connections to Land, Water and Identity Through Indigenous Knowledge
Speaker Q&A: Tammy Stoneman, Sharon Shadow and Flora Asp
Stretch/Coffee/Bathroom Break
Guiding the Journey Recipient Presentation: Role Model
WORKSHOP 2 – A Culture-Based Model For Curriculum Development
Speaker Q&A: Suzanne Methot
Stretch Break with Yoga Instructor Armanda McArthur
Musical Performance by the Grand River Singers Society
Guiding the Journey Recipient Presentation: Culture, Language, Traditions
WORKSHOP 3 – Electric Brain Land aka Computer Country: Workshop on Indigenous Computing
Speaker Q&A: Jon Corbett
Coffee/Bathroom Break
Guiding the Journey Recipient Presentation: Leadership
WORKSHOP 4 – Community Arts as a Source of Resistance with Young Women’s Indigenous Utopia
Speaker Q&A: Jennifer Altenberg, Kari Wuttunee
Closing Remarks
Networking

Friday November 27

12:05 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Welcome/Elder Blessing
Keynote Address – Tanya Talaga
Sponsored by Shell
Keynote Q&A
Tradeshow and Networking Time
Guiding the Journey Recipient Presentation: Innovative Practice
WORKSHOP 5 – Relationships are the Curriculum
Speaker Q&A: Niigaan Sinclair
Coffee/Bathroom Break
Guiding the Journey Recipient Presentation: Partner in Indigenous Education
WORKSHOP 6 – Shifting Paradigms: Creating Space to Walk in Two Worlds
Speaker Q&A: Lydia Sunchild and Laryssa Gorecki
Musical Performance by Riit
Guiding the Journey Recipient Presentation: Organization
WORKSHOP 7 – Project-Based Learning and Community Engagement in Environmental Science with Water First
Speaker Q&A: Adrianna Bilinski and Dillon Koopmans
Coffee/Bathroom Break
WORKSHOP 8 – ONE SONG AT A TIME: Exploring Reconciliation in an Elementary School
Speaker Q&A: Dr. Maria Del Carmen Rodriquez de France
Closing Blessing
Closing Remarks

Workshops

Theme – Indigenous Knowledge: Our Path Forward

Relationships are the Curriculum

Presented by Dr. Niigaan Sinclair
University of Manitoba

Indigenous education is not a lesson or unit plan; it’s a process of living. This is impossible to memorize and contradictory to instruct but based in relationship-making actions that must be lived, practiced, and experienced. So, how do we incorporate Indigenous education in schooling? Hint: it will happen more in the hallways rather than the classrooms.

Connections to Land, Water and Identity Through Indigenous Knowledge

Presented by Tammy Stoneman, Sharon Shadow and Flora Asp
Yukon Education

Oral traditions are essential for preserving Indigenous Knowledge and this workshop will, through a combination of activities and discussions, emphasize the importance of incorporating these oral traditions and First Nations stories into school programming. Featuring words and stories from a Yukon First Nation Elder as well as a young Yukon First Nation storyteller, the session will finish with a sharing circle.

A Culture-Based Model For Curriculum Development

Presented by Suzanne Methot
Education Consultant & Community Worker

In this session, Suzanne will walk participants through the Indigenous Culture-Based Curriculum Planning Framework developed by grandfather/elder Michael Thrasher and a team of Indigenous educators in southern Ontario. This model uses three interrelated processes – the Four Gifts to a Child, the Four Stages of Learning, and the Four Steps in the Learning Process – to create a medicine-wheel-based planning model that reflects Indigenous ideas on balance, inter-relatedness, and transformation for both student and teacher.

Electric Brain Land aka Computer Country: Workshop on Indigenous Computing

Presented by Jon M. R. Corbett
University of British Columbia

Bringing technology into use from an Indigenous perspective is an extension of long-practiced and well-understood cultural and traditional paradigms, and many Indigenous peoples are utilizing these new technological domains to re-establish individual and community identities. This workshop brings together users, teachers, and researchers (Indigenous and otherwise) to discuss and redefine computing technologies and technology projects that intersect with Indigenous worldviews and cultural practices.

Community Arts as a Source of Resistance with Young Women’s Indigenous Utopia

Presented by Jennifer Altenberg and Kari Wuttunee
Young Women’s Indigenous Utopia

Young Indigenous Women’s Utopia is a girls group in Treaty Six Territory and The Traditional Homeland of the Metis (also known as Saskatoon, Saskatchewan). As urban Indigenous teens, we come together from many different nations and communities to combat gender-based and colonial violence. We do this work by engaging in cultural reclamation, ceremony, storytelling and arts-based activism and research.  We are part of a larger transnational project called Networks for Change and More Than Words. https://www.mcgill.ca/morethanwords/

Shifting Paradigms: Creating Space to Walk in Two Worlds

Presented by Lydia Sunchild and Laryssa Gorecki
Thunderchild First Nation & Toronto Catholic District School Board

Following on the YMCA’s cross-cultural exchange in the spring of 2019 between 25 Cree youth from Thunderchild First Nation in northern Saskatchewan and 21 non-Indigenous youth from the Jane & Finch community of Toronto, this presentation explores the group’s aim to disrupt taken-for-granted assumptions about where and how learning takes place. It utilized a holistic approach and developed a framework that directed all four domains of the medicine wheel to ensure experiential learning took place. This presentation will inform educators on ways they might transform educational experiences through Indigenous Knowledge.

Project-Based Learning and Community Engagement in Environmental Science with Water First

Presented by Adrianna Bilinski and Dillon Koopmans
Water First

There is currently a disparity in the representation of Indigenous peoples in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) fields in Canada. This presentation explores the ways in which Water First creates experiential education opportunities for students using a combination of land-based learning, hands-on learning resources, and community involvement. It will also explore the importance of project-based learning to strengthen students’ leadership skills and discuss mentorship opportunities. Participants will be provided with the necessary tools to strengthen both community engagement and STEM education in their schools.

ONE SONG AT A TIME: Exploring Reconciliation in an Elementary School

Presented by Dr. Maria Del Carmen Rodriquez de France
University of Victoria

This session explores the ways in which Grade 5 students have been learning how to deconstruct words such as Decolonization, Indigenization, Reconciliation, Social Justice, Equity, Fairness, and Diversity in order to naturalize Indigenous perspectives within the new provincial curriculum, with examples of the students’ creations being shown. It will also examine the school context where the support of administrators and staff was essential for the development of initiatives that respected and honoured Indigenous Knowledge and traditions.

Instagram